Congrats T20 Pakistan

pakistanFor the country torn by terrorism and internal turmoil,victFor the country torn by terrorism and internal turmoil,victory at the T20 world cup comes as a great moral booster. Congrats Pakistan. The Hindu editorial writes (23 June 2009) Pakistan’s triumph in the second ICC World Twenty20, aside from being richly deserved, expressed the essence of sport, its wondrous capacity to upset conventional calculations. But it was more than that, a redemption moment. Caught in the crossfire of global politics and terrorism, the country’s cricketers had become the unwanted of the cricket world. They entered the tournament undercooked. There was little in their early performances to suggest a campaign so uplifting, so transforming that many Pakistanis see it as bigger than the triumph in the 1992 World Cup. The fear that the country would be marginalised was real — it would have intensified had the side bowed out early. But sport offers those looking for salvation every opportunity, often investing them with the ability and the nerve needed. So although Younis Khan’s men were defeated by England (which despite inventing the format has never come close to mastering it), they found a way of making the semi-finals. Pakistan, traditionally, is at its most dangerous in the knockout stages of a tournament, for it is a side nearly impossible to arrest once possessed of momentum. The team’s transformation, in many ways, was epitomised by Shahid Afridi, its talisman. He had failed with the bat early in the tournament, justifying his place in the side with his canny, under-rated bowling. Recognising the moment, as big-game players do, he asked to be promoted in the semi-final and promptly turned in a match winning half-century. In the final, he was mature, calm-headed, and clinical without compromising on his mercurial talent — everything that can be said of Pakistan in the title clash. Sri Lanka’s brave cricketers, led magnificently by Kumar Sangakkara, must not be forgotten, however. Victims of a heinous terror attack outside the Gadaffi Stadium in Lahore earlier this year, they overcame mental and physical scars to emerge the best side of the tournament before the final. The Sri Lankans play a brand of bright, vibrant, inventive cricket, and it was no surprise that the innovation of the tournament, an outrageous stroke over the wicketkeeper, was supplied by Tillakaratne Dilshan, who was justly adjudged Player of the Tournament. Pakistan and Sri Lanka might appear tied together after the incidents in Lahore, but it was no coincidence that the finalists were the sides with the best bowling attacks of the tournament. In the event, it was Afridi & Co. who lit up London, and in so doing lifted the spirit of a struggling nation. The cricket world is unlikely any time soon to heed Younis Khan’s impassioned plea to visit and play Pakistan, but the triumph has resuscitated cricket in the strife-torn land. ory at the T20 world cup comes as a great moral booster. Congrats Pakistan. The Hindu editorial writes (23 June 2009) Pakistan’s triumph in the second ICC World Twenty20, aside from being richly deserved, expressed the essence of sport, its wondrous capacity to upset conventional calculations. But it was more than that, a redemption moment. Caught in the crossfire of global politics and terrorism, the country’s cricketers had become the unwanted of the cricket world. They entered the tournament undercooked. There was little in their early performances to suggest a campaign so uplifting, so transforming that many Pakistanis see it as bigger than the triumph in the 1992 World Cup. The fear that the country would be marginalised was real — it would have intensified had the side bowed out early. But sport offers those looking for salvation every opportunity, often investing them with the ability and the nerve needed. So although Younis Khan’s men were defeated by England (which despite inventing the format has never come close to mastering it), they found a way of making the semi-finals. Pakistan, traditionally, is at its most dangerous in the knockout stages of a tournament, for it is a side nearly impossible to arrest once possessed of momentum. The team’s transformation, in many ways, was epitomised by Shahid Afridi, its talisman. He had failed with the bat early in the tournament, justifying his place in the side with his canny, under-rated bowling. Recognising the moment, as big-game players do, he asked to be promoted in the semi-final and promptly turned in a match winning half-century. In the final, he was mature, calm-headed, and clinical without compromising on his mercurial talent — everything that can be said of Pakistan in the title clash. Sri Lanka’s brave cricketers, led magnificently by Kumar Sangakkara, must not be forgotten, however. Victims of a heinous terror attack outside the Gadaffi Stadium in Lahore earlier this year, they overcame mental and physical scars to emerge the best side of the tournament before the final. The Sri Lankans play a brand of bright, vibrant, inventive cricket, and it was no surprise that the innovation of the tournament, an outrageous stroke over the wicketkeeper, was supplied by Tillakaratne Dilshan, who was justly adjudged Player of the Tournament. Pakistan and Sri Lanka might appear tied together after the incidents in Lahore, but it was no coincidence that the finalists were the sides with the best bowling attacks of the tournament. In the event, it was Afridi & Co. who lit up London, and in so doing lifted the spirit of a struggling nation. The cricket world is unlikely any time soon to heed Younis Khan’s impassioned plea to visit and play Pakistan, but the triumph has resuscitated cricket in the strife-torn land.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: